Thursday, February 21, 2008

It's not where you were born

It's how quickly you travel over the border.

Chivas and Jesus Padilla now have their story straight. In this article on mediotiempo, They both acknowledge that Jesus was born in San Jose, California. However, they add that he went immediately, within two weeks, to Mexico, and got a birth certificate there. That seems to stretch the definition of "birth certificate", since a person can only be born once in one place. There's also no way to verify the claim of when they traveled across the border, even though it's hard to believe a family with an infant and a mother who has just given birth suddenly feel like traveling to a tiny town in Mexico.

Anyway, the gist from their viewpoint is that there's no problem at all. To play for Chivas, you don't have to be born in Mexico, after all. That's just a technicality.

15 comments:

Anonymous said...

Does that make him a mojado? Just curious.

Anonymous said...

YAWN... such a non-story, Luis.

Toddzilla said...

I feel for the person whose life is so slow that he anonymously comments on a blog about a story that he thinks is a non-story. I guess that equals a non-comment, so...YAWN.

I, however, think it's a fascinating story. I'm also amused at the idea that his family moved to Mexico while he was under two weeks old. Really? Who would do that with their baby?

CACuzcatlan said...

All American families dream of immigrating to Mexico to raise their kids so they can one day play for Chivas....


oh wait, no they don't

Anonymous said...

His parents are from Mexico, he has a Mexican birth certificate, that makes him Mexican. Period. End of story. Get over it.

It's a common practice for Mexican parents to register their kids as Mexican even though they were not born in Mexico. It happened to me. My parents are Mexican but I was not born there. However, I have a Mexican birth certificate that says I was born in Monterrey (which I wasn't). This could also qualify to play for Chivas (technically speaking).

Non-issue! It really goes into the question of what is Mexican nowadays?

Anonymous said...

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Does that make him a mojado? Just curious.


Nice too see that USMNT fan base is still made up of racist scum.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous said...
Nice too see that USMNT fan base is still made up of racist scum.

Nice generalization!

Anonymous said...

Racist scum? I think the current events are blinding some from reality. Or at least, sarcasm?

Chivas is more racist for its phony-birth certifate, xenophobic, hypocritical, distorted views on Mexican nationalism.

Besides, if one doesn't like it, one can go on another blog where this story is irrelevant and/or non-existent.

Until then, go change your diaper and make yourself a bottle.

EAstlachiva said...

Wow, that's rough.

sid said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Anonymous said...

Oh so you want to throw out racial slurs but no be called on them?

FC Uptown said...

Can any Chivas fan explain to someone not familiar, why the Mexican-only Chivas rule is a source of pride to their fans? If my pro baseball team had an exclusionary rule for the roster, it would be very controversial and it may be called racist, and as a fan of the team I would be ashamed of that policy. Clearly, this is a different case but I am not understanding how.

CACuzcatlan said...

I don't disagree that he's Mexican, but Chivas does.

eastlachiva said...

"Things" are different in Mexico.

The Hammer said...

His birth certificate might not be valid, however. The one he obtained in Mexico.

If a previous one existed, then this one would be thrown off as fraudulent, and his parents could face jail time.